Ree Drummond’s Cinnamon Rolls

There is no kneading and no eggs in this wonderful recipe from Ree Drummond thepioneerwoman.com who was kind enough to go into detail to help us make these. Go to her blog to see the pictures but use my measurements below  and you will still make a huge amount.)

Check your pantry first to make sure you have these ingredients, to make 3-4 pans
The first time you make them  make them exactly like this as the coffee in the icing is the prizewinning secret. You can change it to whatever you want the next time around. And if you don’t drink coffee, borrow a cup of brewed from a neighbor…Tell them you will bring them a cinnamon roll if they will save you a 1/2 cup of coffee from their breakfast pot!

  • Active Dry Yeast – 1 package
  • Baking powder
  • Baking soda
  • Butter (real) – 1 cup softened
  • Cinnamon
  • Coffee – 2 Tablespoons, brewed
  • Flour –  4 1/2  cups of all-purpose
  • Maple flavoring
  • Milk – 3 C whole
  • Salt
  • Sugar – 1  1/4 cup of regular
  • Sugar  – bag of powdered sugar.
  • Vegetable oil – 1/2 C
  • I would recommend putting newspaper down on the counter to avoid the flour mess.

    1.      Mix: 2 C whole milk, 1/2 C vegetable oil  and 1/2 C sugar in a pan. “Scald” the mixture (heat until just before the boiling point.) Turn off heat and leave to cool 45 minutes to 1 hour.

    2.      When the mixture is lukewarm to warm, but NOT hot, sprinkle in 1 packages Active Dry Yeast . (Milk  MUST  be lukewarm….If the milk is too hot you kill it keeping them from rising correctly and will be flat.) For those of you with thermometers, the milk mixture should be between 110 and 115 degrees Fahrenheit

    3.      Let set for a minute so the yeast gets all warm and moist.

    4.      Add 4 cups of all-purpose flour.

    5.      Stir mixture together, make sure you get the stuff in the corners. Cover and let sit for at least an hour.

    6.      Add 1/2 C more  of flour…

    7.      1/2 heaping teaspoon baking powder

    8.      1/2 “scant” (less than a full) teaspoon baking soda

    9.      1/2 Tablespoon of salt.

    10.  Stir mixture together. At this point, you can just go ahead and make the rolls or you could cover the dough and put it in the fridge until you need it—overnight or even a day or two, if necessary. Just keep your eye on it and if it starts to splurge out of the pan, just punch it down. (Some say they found cold dough much easier to roll out and roll back up. It stays together and holds up better so I suggest letting it chill for at least a few hours.)

    11.  When you are ready to make them, sprinkle surface generously with flour.

    12.  Take half the dough and form a rough rectangle.

    13.  Roll the dough thin, maintaining a general rectangular shape. Rectangle should increase in both width and length as you roll it out.

    14.  FILLING: whip in 3/4 cup of sugar  to 1 cups softened butter

    15.  spread it on thick on the dough.

    16.  add a generous sprinkling (A LOT) of cinnamon…

    17.  Starting at the opposite end, begin rolling the dough in a neat line toward you. Keep the roll relatively tight as you go. Some of the butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture may ooze out toward the end, but that’s no big deal.

    18.  Pinch the seam to the roll to seal it.

    19.  Spread 1 tablespoon of melted butter in 3-4 round, foil cake or pie pans. Begin cutting* rolls approximately 3/4 to 1 inch thick and laying them in the buttered pans. (See note below about cutting dough.)

    20.  Let the rolls sit for 20 to 30 minutes to rise.  (Don’t worry if they aren’t pretty before you cook them. Once they cook and puff up, they fill in all the gaps.)

    21.  Bake at 400 degrees until light golden brown, about 15 to 18 minutes. (Watch it close as your oven may be different from mine.)
    *(From #19 above) CUTTING THE ROLLED UP DOUGH: It makes it easier and prettier if you cut with sewing thread (or dental floss) because it doesn’t squish the roundness of the roll at all.  Simply cut a length of thread (or floss) about a foot long. Holding the thread/floss in both hands slide it under the roll of dough until it’s about an inch from the edge of the roll. Wrap the thread up around top the roll, crossing them over, and then pull tight  The thread neatly tightens around the roll until it cuts through it, neatly and perfectly from outside in, keeping the slice nice and round. Toss the thread/floss, when done, so there is less mess to clean up!!

    While the rolls are in the oven, make the delicious maple frosting. (Make it exactly for your first batch, please….try it before you start substituting other icings. This is the prize winning secret.)

    1.      To a mixing bowl, add 1/2  bag of powdered sugar.

    2.      To this, add about 1 teaspoons maple flavoring…

    3.      1/4 cup milk…

    4.      2 Tablespoons  melted butter…

    5.       2 Tablespoons  of brewed coffee.

    6.      a generous pinch of salt.

    7.      The mixture should be thick but pourable. Taste and adjust as needed.

    8.      Generously drizzle frosting over warm rolls after you pull them out of the oven.

    9.      Don’t be afraid to drown them. Be sure to get frosting around the perimeter of the pan, too, so the icing will coat the outside of the rolls.

    10.  The frosting will settle in and become one with the cinnamon rolls.  Now you have pans of the most fabulous creations ever, guaranteed to make you happy, fat, and the most popular person aroun


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This entry was posted in Baby Boomers, Cheaper and healthier than packaged, Food, Grandparenting, Parenting, Recipes, Things to see and do in Tulsa, Tulsa, Uncategorized, Veterans. Bookmark the permalink.

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